They Dare to Speak Out

People and Institutions Confront Israel's Lobby

They Dare to Speak Out

The first book to speak out against the pervasive influence of the American-Israeli Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) on American politics, policy, and institutions resonates today as never before. With careful documentation and specific case histories, former congressman Paul Findley demonstrates how the Israel lobby helps to shape important aspects of U.S. foreign policy and influences congressional, senatorial, and even presidential elections. Described are the undue influence AIPAC exerts in the Senate and the House and the pressure AIPAC brings to bear on university professors and journalists who seem too sympathetic to Arab and Islamic states and too critical of Israel and its policies. Along with many longtime outspoken critics, new voices speaking out include former President Jimmy Carter, U.S. Representative Cynthia McKinney, Senator Robert Byrd, prominent Arab-American Dr. Ziad Asali, Rabbi Michael Lerner, and journalist Charles Reese. In addition, the lack of open debate among politicians with regard to the U.S. policy in the Middle East is lamented, and AIPAC is blamed in part for this censorship. Connections are drawn between America's unconditional support of Israel and the raging anti-American passions around the world--and ultimately the tragic events of 9/11. This replaces 1556520735.

Deliberate deceptions

facing the facts about the U.S.-Israeli relationship

Deliberate deceptions

Findley outlines a strong anti-Israeli position. Using provocative themes to set the tone, he delves into three aspects of the Arab-Israeli conflict: "Statehood and Conquest," "Collusion and Conflict," and "Perils to Peace." Basing his argument upon a notion that all problems can be separated into two clear and unequivocal ideal positions of right and wrong, Findley popularizes a highly complex social and political conflict.

The Arab Lobby and US Foreign Policy

The Two-State Solution

The Arab Lobby and US Foreign Policy

The US foreign policy stance on Israel-Palestine has shifted considerably in recent years, from a position of "Israel only" to one which embraces both Israel and Palestine in a call for peace. This volume assesses why the US stance has evolved in the way that it has, concluding that while international factors cannot be overlooked, developments within the United States itself are also crucial. After years of vacillating on Palestinian national aspirations, the majority of Americans, the author notes, have come to favor the establishment of an independent Palestinian state on the West Bank and the Gaza strip. Considering what accounts for changes in US policy on Israel-Palestine, this volume: delivers a thorough assessment of the role of international and domestic factors in shaping US policy in this area considers how US policy has evolved from the Camp David negotiations of the 1970s up to the occupation of Iraq in the mid 2000s explores the significance of American public opinion and the pro-Israel and Arab lobbies in the evolution of US policy The Arab Lobby and US Foreign Policy will be of interest to students and scholars of Foreign Policy and Political Science, Current Affairs and American Studies. Khalil M. Marrar is Professor at DePaul University, USA. He has served in editorial positions at the Arab Studies Quarterly and the Association of Arab-American University Graduates.

U.S. Foreign Policy Discourse and the Israel Lobby

The Clinton Administration and the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Process

U.S. Foreign Policy Discourse and the Israel Lobby

This book seeks to debunk the popular myth of an all-powerful pro-Israel lobby. Here, Kiely demonstrates how discourses surrounding American Identity and US foreign policy towards the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, which has deep roots in American historicity, have constructed an understanding of the conflict which is inherently more susceptible to the Israeli narrative. This text argues that the so-called power of what other researchers, such as Mearsheimer and Walt (2006, 2007), call ‘The Israel Lobby’ are limited by these discourses. It is my contention that groups such as The American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) serve to amplify and reproduce existing representations within these discourses which align the United States and Israel in terms of cultural, historical and political values while simultaneously reinforcing dominant representations of the Palestinian ‘Other’.

Speaking Out

A Congressman's Lifelong Fight Against Bigotry, Famine, and War

Speaking Out

In his twenty-two years as an Illinois congressman and in the years since he left office, Paul Findley has fought to eradicate famine, end wars, and eliminate bigotry in U.S. foreign policy. This sweeping political memoir opens with Findley’s early days in rural Pittsfield, Illinois, and chronicles his service during six administrations in Washington. His many accomplishments in Congress include authoring the Famine Prevention Act, coauthoring the 1973 War Powers Resolution, leading agricultural trade missions to the Soviet Union and China, and strongly opposing the Vietnam War. This autobiography is also a no-holds-barred critique of Israel’s lobby and its toll on the national interests of the United States. Few politicians are so openly critical of their government, and Findley’s opinions on what he believes to be disastrous foreign policy provide a unique behind-the-scenes perspective on the shaping of these policies in the latter half of the twentieth century.

The One-state Solution

A Breakthrough for Peace in the Israeli-Palestinian Deadlock

The One-state Solution

The one-state solution demonstrates that Israeli settlements have already encroached on the occupied territory of the West Bank and Gaza Strip to the extent that any Palestinian state in those areas is unviable. It reveals the irreversible impact of Israel's settlement grid by summarising its physical, demographic, financial and political dimensions. Virginia Q.Tilley explains why we should assume that this grid will not be withdrawn - or its expansion reversed - by reviewing the role of the key political actors: the Israeli government, the United States, the Arab states, and the European Union. Finally the book addresses the daunting obstacles to a one-state solution - including major revision of the Zionist dream but also Palestinian and other regional resistance - and offers some ideas about how these obstacles might be addressed.

Blood and the Covenant

The Historical Consequences of the Contract with God

Blood and the Covenant

Blood and the Covenant tells the story of a mindsetthe conception of a personal covenant between God and manand the insidious consequences of this mindset. Author Pierre Parisien examines the history of covenantal belief and looks critically at two of its most troubling aspects: appropriation (the Promised Land) and moral dispensation (the belief that if you are doing it for God, then it is not a sin but a virtuous act). Parisien traces the historical consequences of the contract with God, from the campaigns of Joshua in Canaan to the present manifestations of ideological Zionism. He argues that the course of history has been, in great part, a consequence of the original Covenant, and he charts the regrettable lineage of atrocities committed under the auspices of covenant fulfillmentincluding the conquest of Canaan to the hegemony of Rome, the rape of Northern India by the Muslim Sultans, the Crusades, European colonialism (which considered the entire planet as the Promised Land), Manifest Destiny, and ideological Zionism. Wars, crimes against humanity, and genocide have too often been the aftermath of the Covenant. Will this woeful progression ever come to an end?

Road to Iraq

Road to Iraq

Ahmad presents a social history of the war's leading agents "e; the neoconservatives "e; and shows how this ideologically coherent group of determined political agents used the contingency of 9/11 to overwhelm a sceptical foreign policy establishment, milit

The Origins of Alliances

The Origins of Alliances

How are alliances made? In this book, Stephen M. Walt makes a significant contribution to this topic, surveying theories of the origins of international alliances and identifying the most important causes of security cooperation between states. In addition, he proposes a fundamental change in the present conceptions of alliance systems. Contrary to traditional balance-of-power theories, Walt shows that states form alliances not simply to balance power but in order to balance threats. Walt begins by outlining five general hypotheses about the causes of alliances. Drawing upon diplomatic history and a detailed study of alliance formation in the Middle East between 1955 and 1979, he demonstrates that states are more likely to join together against threats than they are to ally themselves with threatening powers. Walt also examines the impact of ideology on alliance preferences and the role of foreign aid and transnational penetration. His analysis show, however, that these motives for alignment are relatively less important. In his conclusion, he examines the implications of "balance of threat" for U.S. foreign policy.

Orient

Orient