Triumph of the City

How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier

Triumph of the City

A pioneering urban economist presents a myth-shattering look at the majesty and greatness of cities America is an urban nation, yet cities get a bad rap: they're dirty, poor, unhealthy, environmentally unfriendly . . . or are they? In this revelatory book, Edward Glaeser, a leading urban economist, declares that cities are actually the healthiest, greenest, and richest (in both cultural and economic terms) places to live. He travels through history and around the globe to reveal the hidden workings of cities and how they bring out the best in humankind. Using intrepid reportage, keen analysis, and cogent argument, Glaeser makes an urgent, eloquent case for the city's importance and splendor, offering inspiring proof that the city is humanity's greatest creation and our best hope for the future. "A masterpiece." -Steven D. Levitt, coauthor of Freakonomics "Bursting with insights." -The New York Times Book Review

Understanding Jacques Ellul

Understanding Jacques Ellul

Jacques Ellul (1912-1994) was one of the world's last great polymaths and one of the most important Christian thinkers of his time, engaging the world with a simplicity, sincerity, courage, and passion that few have matched. However, Ellul is an often misunderstood thinker. As more than fifty books and over one thousand articles bear his name, embarking on a study of Ellul's thought can be daunting. This book provides an introduction to Ellul's life and work, analyzing and assessing his thought across the most important themes of his scholarship. Readers will see that his remarkably broad field of vision, clarity of focus, and boldly prophetic voice make his work worth reading and considering, rereading and discussing.

The Moral Arc

How Science Makes Us Better People

The Moral Arc

Bestselling author Michael Shermer's exploration of science and morality that demonstrates how the scientific way of thinking has made people, and society as a whole, more moral From Galileo and Newton to Thomas Hobbes and Martin Luther King, Jr., thinkers throughout history have consciously employed scientific techniques to better understand the non-physical world. The Age of Reason and the Enlightenment led theorists to apply scientific reasoning to the non-scientific disciplines of politics, economics, and moral philosophy. Instead of relying on the woodcuts of dissected bodies in old medical texts, physicians opened bodies themselves to see what was there; instead of divining truth through the authority of an ancient holy book or philosophical treatise, people began to explore the book of nature for themselves through travel and exploration; instead of the supernatural belief in the divine right of kings, people employed a natural belief in the right of democracy. In The Moral Arc, Shermer will explain how abstract reasoning, rationality, empiricism, skepticism--scientific ways of thinking--have profoundly changed the way we perceive morality and, indeed, move us ever closer to a more just world.

Shrinking Cities

A Global Perspective

Shrinking Cities

This book examines a rapidly emerging new topic in urban settlement patterns: the role of shrinking cities. Much coverage is given to declining fertility rates, ageing populations and economic restructuring as the factors behind shrinking cities, but there is also reference to resource depletion, the demise of single-company towns and the micro-location of environmental hazards. The contributions show that shrinkage can occur at any scale – from neighbourhood to macro-region - and they consider whether shrinkage of metropolitan areas as a whole may be a future trend. Also addressed in this volume is the question of whether urban shrinkage policies are necessary or effective. The book comprises four parts: world or regional issues (with reference to the European Union and Latin America); national case studies (the United States, India, China, Korea, Taiwan, Germany, Romania and Estonia); city case studies (Detroit, Buffalo, Cleveland, Naples, Belfast and Halle); and broad issues such as the environmental consequences of shrinking cities. This book will be of interest to scholars and practitioners working in the fields of urban studies, economic geography and public policy.

Urban Politics

Cities and Suburbs in a Global Age

Urban Politics

This popular text mixes classic theory and research on urban politics with the most recent developments and data in urban and metropolitan affairs. Its balanced and realistic approach helps students understand the nature of urban politics and the difficulty of finding effective "solutions" in a suburban and global age. The ninth edition has been thoroughly rewritten and updated with a continued focus on economic development and race, plus renewed attention to globalization, gentrification, and changing demographics. Boxed case studies of prominent recent and current urban development efforts provide material for class discussion, and concluding material demonstrates the tradeoff between more "ideal" and more "pragmatic" urban politics. Key changes in this edition include: Every chapter has been thoroughly updated and rewritten. The Ninth Edition reflects the most current census data and the newest trends in such areas as the "new immigration," suburbanization, gentrification, and big-city revivals; There is coverage of the big-city pension crisis and politics in Stockton, Detroit, and other cities facing possible bankruptcy; A brand-new opening chapter introduces the concepts of the Global City, the Entertainment City, and the Bankrupt City; New photos and boxes appear throughout the book; Increased coverage of policies for sustainable urban development.

Cities Are Good for You

The Genius of the Metropolis

Cities Are Good for You

The 21st century will be the age of the city. Already over 50% of the world population live in urban centres and over the coming decades this percentage will increase. Blending anecdote, fact and first hand encounters - from exploring the slums of Mumbai, to visiting roof-top farms in Brooklyn and attending secret dinner parties in Paris, to riding the bus in Latin America - Leo Hollis reveals that we have misunderstood how cities work for too long. Upending long-held assumptions and challenging accepted wisdom, he explores: why cities can never be rational, organised places; how we can walk in a crowd without bumping into people, and if we can design places that make people want to kiss; whether we have the right solution to the problem of the slums; how ants, slime mould and traffic jams can make us rethink congestion. And above all, the unexpected reasons why living in the city can make us fitter, richer, smarter, greener, more creative - and, perhaps, even happier. Cities Are Good for You introduces dreamers, planners, revolutionaries, writers, scientists, architects, slum-dwellers and emperors. It is shaped by the idea that cities are the greatest social experiment in human history, built for people, and by the people.

Modern Urban and Regional Economics

Modern Urban and Regional Economics

Modern Urban and Regional Economics,Second Edition, explains the spatial economic foundations of the behavior of urban and regional economies, highlighting the differences between the two types of economy. By employing an explicitly spatial approach, author Philip McCann is able to discuss both urban and regional economics within a single integrated framework. He presents clear, model-based explanations from first principles and also provides extensive graphic illustrations of the theories discussed. Covering classical approaches along with the latest models, this unique text helps students gain a thorough understanding of both basic analytical techniques and the most state-of-the-art thinking in the field. Technical appendices to each chapter allow students to further investigate the main principles and theories discussed in the text. New to this Edition: * Adds two new chapters on spatial data analysis and globalization and global regions * Incorporates new research, policies, and examples * Supplemented by aCompanion Websitethat features questions and cases for students and PowerPoint-based slides and figures from the book for instructors

Creating Economic Growth

Lessons for Europe

Creating Economic Growth

As national leaders struggle to revive their economies, the people of Europe face a stark reality, which has created an opportunity for local leaders and citizen movers and shakers to rise to the occasion to spur revitalization from the bottom up. The author offers a six-point plan to prosperity.

Innovating in Urban Economies

Economic Transformation in Canadian City-Regions

Innovating in Urban Economies

In a globalizing, knowledge-based economy, innovation and creative capacity lead to economic prosperity. Starting in 2006, the Innovation Systems Research Network began a six year-long study on how city-regions in Canada were surviving and thriving in a globalized world. That study resulted in the “Innovation, Creativity, and Governance in Canadian City-Regions” series, which examines the impact of innovation, talent, and institutions on sixteen city-regions across Canada. This volume explores how the social dynamics that influence innovation and knowledge flows in Canadian city-regions contribute to transformation and long-term growth. With case studies examining cities of all sizes, from Toronto to Moncton, Innovating in Urban Economies analyzes the impact of size, location, and the regional economy on innovation and knowledge in Canada’s cities.

Reversing Urban Decline

Why and How Sports, Entertainment, and Culture Turn Cities into Major League Winners, Second Edition

Reversing Urban Decline

Detroit’s bankruptcy is the most severe example of the financial implications of the movement of wealth to the suburbs. When residents and businesses leave, central cities have a disproportionate share of most regions’ lower-income households. At the same time, many central cities collect less revenue as states cut financial support. So, we are left with the question: can central cities change patterns of economic activity? In Reversing Urban Decline: Why and How Sports, Entertainment, and Culture Turn Cities into Major League Winners, Second Edition author Mark Rosentraub details how central cities facing increasing levels of economic segregation can use new urban areas anchored by sports venues to enhance their financial position. See What’s New in the Second Edition: Increased focus on urban revitalization, urban theory, and urban planning Two additional case studies (Denver and Fort Wayne) to give the book a broader appeal and more material to make the book a good fit for urban planning, urban studies, and public policy classes New data based on additional research and follow up on several of the original cases Rosentraub anchors the book more closely in the center of the debate on urban revitalization, the financial issues facing central cities, and the ways in which public leaders can respond to the economic segregation developing between central cities and their suburban areas. That disparity is reducing the taxes that central cities receive, reducing their ability to provide the services residents need. Rather than just provide us with a brief escape from our problems, sports and entertainment, with the right leadership, can create opportunities for our cities to reinvent and reinvigorate themselves. Placing sports as one of the central elements to revitalize urban centers, this book uses several case studies to develop a set of rules to help cities plan for the effective use and returns from their investments in sports, entertainment, and cultural centers.