Victor Turner and Contemporary Cultural Performance

Victor Turner and Contemporary Cultural Performance

In the twenty years following Victor Turner's death, interventions on the interconnected performance modes of play, drama, and community (dimensions of which Turner deemed the limen), and experimental and analytical forays into the anthropologies of experience and consciousness, have complemented and extended Turnerian readings on the moments and sites of culture's becoming. Examining Turner's continued relevance in performance and popular culture, pilgrimage and communitas, as well as Edith Turner's role, the contributors reflect on the wide application of Victor Turner's thought to cultural performance in the early twenty-first century and explore how Turner's ideas have been re-engaged, renovated, and repurposed in studies of contemporary cultural performance.

Turner

Turner

As a blind person might see the world if the gift of sight were suddenly returned - this is how we might describe the effect of William Turner's paintings on the observer. This book demonstrates that he was not simply illustrating nature, but that his pictures speak directly to the eye as nature does itself - through a world of light and colour.

The Forest of Symbols

Aspects of Ndembu Ritual

The Forest of Symbols

Collection of 10 articles previously published on various aspects of ritual symbolism among the Ndembu of Zambia; p.83-4; brief mention of C.P. Mountford on Aboriginal colour symbolism; Primarly for use in cultural comparison.

Nat Turner

A Slave Rebellion in History and Memory

Nat Turner

Nat Turner's name rings through American history with a force all its own. Leader of the most important slave rebellion on these shores, variously viewed as a murderer of unarmed women and children, an inspired religious leader, a fanatic—this puzzling figure represents all the terrible complexities of American slavery. And yet we do not know what he looked like, where he is buried, or even whether Nat Turner was his real name. In Nat Turner: A Slave Rebellion in History and Memory, Kenneth S. Greenberg gathers twelve distinguished scholars to offer provocative new insight into the man, his rebellion, and his time, and his place in history. The historians here explore Turner's slave community, discussing the support for his uprising as well as the religious and literary context of his movement. They examine the place of women in his insurrection, and its far-reaching consequences (including an extraordinary 1832 Virginia debate about ridding the state of slavery). Here are discussions of Turner's religious visions—the instructions he received from God to kill all of his white oppressors. Louis Masur places him against the backdrop of the nation's sectional crisis, and Douglas Egerton puts his revolt in the context of rebellions across the Americas. We trace Turner's passage through American memory through fascinating interviews with William Styron on his landmark novel, The Confessions of Nat Turner, and with Dr. Alvin Poussaint, one of the "ten black writers" of the 1960s who bitterly attacked Styron's vision of Turner. Finally, we follow Nat Turner into the world of Hollywood. Nat Turner has always been controversial, an emblem of the searing wound of slavery in American life. This book offers a clear-eyed look at one of the best known and least understood figures in our history.

Rereading Frederick Jackson Turner

"The Significance of the Frontier in American History", and Other Essays

Rereading Frederick Jackson Turner

In 1893 a young Frederick Jackson Turner stood before the American Historical Association and delivered his famous frontier thesis. To a less than enthusiastic audience, he argued that "the existence of an area of free land, its continuous recession, and the advance of American settlement westward explain American development"; that this frontier accounted for American democracy and character; and that the frontier had closed forever with uncertain consequences for the American future. Despite the indifference of Turner's first audience, his essay would soon prove to be the single most influential piece of writing on American history, with extraordinary impact both in intellectual circles and in popular literature. Within a few years his views had become the dominant interpretation of the American past. A collection of his essays won the Pulitzer Prize, and for almost half a century, Turner's thesis was the most familiar model taught in schools, extolled by politicians, and screened in fictional form at local movie theaters each Saturday afternoon. Now, a hundred years after Turner's famous address, award-winning biographer John Mack Faragher collects and introduces the pioneer historian's ten most significant essays. Remarkable for their truly modern sense that a debate about the past is simultaneously a debate about the present, these essays remain stimulating reading, both as a road map to the early-twentieth-century American mind and as a model of committed scholarship. Faragher introduces us to Turner's work with a look at his role as a public intellectual and his effect on Americans' understanding of their national character. In the afterword, Faragher turns to the recent heated debate over Turner's legacy. Western history has reemerged in the news as historians argue over Turner's place in our current mind-set. In a world of dizzying intellectual change, it may come as something of a surprise that historians have taken so long to overturn the interpretation of a century-old conference paper. But while some claim that Turner's vision of the American West as a great egalitarian land of opportunity was long ago dismissed, others, in the words of historian Donald Worster, maintain that Turner still "presides over western history like a Holy Ghost.". Against this backdrop, Faragher looks at what the concept of the West means to us today and provides a reader's guide to the provocative new literature of the American frontier. Rereading these essays in the fresh light of Faragher's analysis brings new appreciation for the richness of Turner's work and an understanding of contemporary historians' admiration for Turner's commitment to the study of what it has meant to be American.

Turner Station

Turner Station

In 1888, a passenger freight station was built by the Baltimore and Sparrows Point Railroad on land owned by Joshua J. Turner, a local businessman. The train stop was called Turner Station, and as the nearby community grew, it took on that name. The community's first church, St. Matthews Methodist Church, was founded in 1900, while the first public school, Turner Elementary School, was built in 1925. Adams Bar and Cocktail Lounge, an important entertainment establishment, came into being in 1933. It attracted top acts in African American music and comedy during the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s, including Red Foxx, Pearl Bailey, and Fats Domino. Turner Station was home to individuals who made lasting contributions to the state and nation, including Dr. Joseph Thomas, physician, businessman, and diplomat; Kweisi Mfume, NAACP president; Calvin Hill, former NFL star; and Kevin Clash, puppeteer.

Social Influence

Social Influence

This milestone text provides a critical evaluation, interpretation, and development of findings and theory in social influence.

Victor Turner and the Construction of Cultural Criticism

Between Literature and Anthropology

Victor Turner and the Construction of Cultural Criticism

During the past twenty years of intellectual boundary-crossing and widespread borrowing between fields, Turner's notions of "liminality" and the "processual" have been adopted by many theorists of art and society. This is the first volume to place individual Turner concepts into the context of his entire career and to spell out their implications for literary studies.