Whistling Vivaldi And Other Clues To How Stereotypes Affect Us Issues Of Our Time

Author: Claude M. Steele
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 9780393341485
Size: 59.54 MB
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The acclaimed social psychologist offers an insider’s look at his research and groundbreaking findings on stereotypes and identity. Claude M. Steele, who has been called “one of the few great social psychologists,” offers a vivid first-person account of the research that supports his groundbreaking conclusions on stereotypes and identity. He sheds new light on American social phenomena from racial and gender gaps in test scores to the belief in the superior athletic prowess of black men, and lays out a plan for mitigating these “stereotype threats” and reshaping American identities.

Whistling Vivaldi How Stereotypes Affect Us And What We Can Do Issues Of Our Time

Author: Claude Steele
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company
ISBN: 0393339726
Size: 69.85 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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In Whistling Vivaldi, described as a 'beautifully-written account' of the relationship between stereotypes and identity, Claude Steele offers a vivid first-person detailing of the research that brought him to his groundbreaking conclusions. Through the telling of dramatic personal stories, Dr. Steele shares the process of constructing and completing experiments and statistical studies that show that exposing subjects to stereotypes - merely reminding a group of female math majors about to take a math test, for example, that women are considered naturally inferior to men at math - impairs their performance in the area affected by the stereotype. Steele's conclusions shed new light on a host of American social phenomena, from the racial and gender gaps in standardized test scores to the belief in the superior athletic prowess of black men. As Homi Bhabha states, 'Steele's book is both urgent and important in understanding the tyranny of the stereotype and liberating ourselves from its derogatory, one-dimensional vision.' Whistling Vivaldi presents a new way of looking at identity and the way it is shaped by social expectations, and, in Richard Thompson Ford's words, 'offers a clear and compelling analysis and, better still, straightforward and practical solutions.'

The Oxford Handbook Of Stigma Discrimination And Health

Author: Brenda Major
Publisher: Oxford University Press
ISBN: 0190696672
Size: 61.52 MB
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Stigma leads to poorer health. Edited by Brenda Major, John F. Dovidio, and Bruce G. Link, The Oxford Handbook of Stigma, Discrimination, and Health provides compelling evidence from various disciplines in support of this thesis and explains how and why health disparities exist and persist. Stigmatization involves distinguishing people by a socially conferred "mark," seeing them as deviant, and devaluing and socially excluding them. The core insight of this book is that the social processes of stigma reliably translate into the biology of disease and death. Contributors elucidate this insight by showing exactly how stigma negatively affects health and creates health disparities through multiple mechanisms operating at different levels of influence. Understanding the causes and consequences of health disparities requires a multi-level analysis that considers structural forces, psychological processes, and biological mechanisms. This volume's unique multidisciplinary approach brings together social and health psychologists, sociologists, public health scholars, and medical ethicists to comprehensively assess stigma's impact on health. It goes beyond the common practice of studying one stigmatized group at a time to examine the stigma-health link across multiple stigmatized groups. This broad, multidisciplinary framework not only illuminates the significant effects stigma has when aggregated across the health of many groups but also increases understanding of which stigma processes are general across groups and which are particular to specific groups. Here, a compendium of leading international experts point readers toward potential policy responses and possibilities for intervention as well as to the large gaps in understanding that remain. This book is the definitive source of scholarship on stigma and physical health for established and emerging scholars, practitioners, and students in psychology, sociology, public health, medicine, law, political science, geography, and the allied disciplines.

Faculty Development In The Age Of Evidence

Author: Andrea L. Beach
Publisher: Stylus Publishing, LLC
ISBN: 1620362708
Size: 48.13 MB
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The first decade of the 21st century brought major challenges to higher education, all of which have implications for and impact the future of faculty professional development. This volume provides the field with an important snapshot of faculty development structures, priorities and practices in a period of change, and uses the collective wisdom of those engaged with teaching, learning, and faculty development centers and programs to identify important new directions for practice. Building on their previous study of a decade ago, published under the title of Creating the Future of Faculty Development, the authors explore questions of professional preparation and pathways, programmatic priorities, collaboration, and assessment. Since the publication of this earlier study, the pressures on faculty development have only escalated—demands for greater accountability from regional and disciplinary accreditors, fiscal constraints, increasing diversity in types of faculty appointments, and expansion of new technologies for research and teaching. Centers have been asked to address a wider range of institutional issues and priorities based on these challenges. How have they responded and what strategies should centers be considering? These are the questions this book addresses. For this new study the authors re-surveyed faculty developers on perceived priorities for the field as well as practices and services offered. They also examined more deeply than the earlier study the organization of faculty development, including characteristics of directors; operating budgets and staffing levels of centers; and patterns of collaboration, re-organization and consolidation. In doing so they elicited information on centers’ “signature programs,” and the ways that they assess the impact of their programs on teaching and learning and other key outcomes. What emerges from the findings are what the authors term a new Age of Evidence, influenced by heightened stakeholder interest in the outcomes of undergraduate education and characterized by a focus on assessing the impact of instruction on student learning, of academic programs on student success, and of faculty development in institutional mission priorities. Faculty developers are responding to institutional needs for assessment, at the same time as they are being asked to address a wider range of institutional priorities in areas such as blended and online teaching, diversity, and the scale-up of evidence-based practices. They face the need to broaden their audiences, and address the needs of part-time, non-tenure-track, and graduate student instructors as well as of pre-tenure and post-tenure faculty. They are also feeling increased pressure to demonstrate the “return on investment” of their programs. This book describes how these faculty development and institutional needs and priorities are being addressed through linkages, collaborations, and networks across institutional units; and highlights the increasing role of faculty development professionals as organizational “change agents” at the department and institutional levels, serving as experts on the needs of faculty in larger organizational discussions.

Making Black Scientists

Author: Marybeth Gasman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 0674916581
Size: 71.45 MB
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Historically black colleges and universities are adept at training scientists. Marybeth Gasman and Thai-Huy Nguyen follow ten HBCU programs that have grown their student cohorts and improved performance. These science departments furnish a bold new model for other colleges that want to better serve African American students.

Ableism The Causes And Consequence Of Disability Prejudice

Author: Michelle R. Nario-Redmond
Publisher: John Wiley & Sons
ISBN: 1119142075
Size: 50.32 MB
Format: PDF
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Ableism is the first to integrate the social-scientific literature on the many origins and manifestations of prejudice against disabled people—a group stereotyped as incompetent and dependent—a group that provokes reactions ranging from fear and contempt to pity and inspiration. Synthesizing classic and contemporary studies on the evolutionary, ideological, and cognitive-emotional sources of ableism, this work also examines new manifestations of ableism including sympathetic, envious, exploitive, and still brutal forms of dehumanization while describing the impacts of ableism from personal accounts, along with interventions for social change and increased equality. This book addresses key inquiries including: What does prejudice against disabled people look like? What are the causes of ableism and how is it perpetuated? How do disabled people respond to prejudice, and how do these responses affect well-being? What works to reduce ableism, promote understanding, and increase human rights? And, what should an agenda for future research include?

Education And Democracy In The 21st Century

Author: Nel Noddings
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807772313
Size: 35.22 MB
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"Educational philosopher Nel Noddings draws on John Dewey's foundational work to reimagine education's aims and curriculum for the 21st century. Noddings looks at education as a multi-aim enterprise in which schools must address needs in all three domains of life: home and family, occupational, and civic. She raises critical questions about the current enthusiasm for standardization, the search for 'one-best-way' solutions, and the practice of maintaining a sharp separation between the disciplines. Comprehensive in its scope, chapters examine the liberal arts curriculum, vocational education, restructuring secondary school, extracurricular activities, national and global citizenship, critical thinking, and moral education."--Back cover.

Un Learning Disability

Author: AnnMarie Baines
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 0807772720
Size: 37.20 MB
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How do high school students confront and resolve conflicting messages about their intelligence and academic potential, particularly when labeled with social and learning disabilities? How does disability become “disablement” when negative attitudes and disparaging perceptions of ability position students as outsiders? Following the lives of adolescents at home and at school, the author makes visible the disabling language, contextual arrangements, and unconscious social practices that restrict learning regardless of special education services. She also showcases how young people resist disablement to transform their worlds and pursue pathways most important to them. Educators and scholars can use this important resource to recognize and change disabling practices that are often taken for granted as a natural part of schooling. Book Features: Offers concrete ways that students, schools, and teachers can unlearn disabling behaviors. Illuminates how social processes of disablement take place, rather than simply describing their influence. Looks at settings where students encounter more flexible ideas of ability and intelligence. “AnnMarie Baines shows us how LD can be rephrased, readdressed, and reworked. LD can be a good idea again, but the labels have to be tied to conditions of growth, identity enhancement, and institutional change.” —From the Foreword by Ray McDermott, professor, Stanford Graduate School of Education "Through compelling narrative vignettes and clear expository commentary, the author makes a persuasive case that adolescents' ‘abilities’ and ‘disabilities’ are situational, not fixed. The moral of her stories is this: change the social situations of learning to foreground and affirm ability rather than disability.” —Frederick Erickson, George F. Kneller Professor of Anthropology of Education, emeritus, University of California, Los Angeles “This book will touch everyone. The stories ring with familiar pain, strategies of persistence, and the randomness of what counts for success or failure. Valuable resources are lost to labels given too lightly for far too many; this volume tells us how to recoup and to protect these resources and to restore hope by doing so.” —Shirley Brice Heath, Margery Bailey Professor of English and Dramatic Literature and professor of linguistics, emerita, Stanford University AnnMarie Darrow Baines is an assistant professor in the department of secondary education at San Francisco State University.

Between Worlds

Author: Bachman
Publisher: Addison-Wesley
ISBN: 9780321049636
Size: 41.24 MB
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