White Teeth

White Teeth

Zadie Smith’s dazzling debut caught critics grasping for comparisons and deciding on everyone from Charles Dickens to Salman Rushdie to John Irving and Martin Amis. But the truth is that Zadie Smith’s voice is remarkably, fluently, and altogether wonderfully her own. Nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read At the center of this invigorating novel are two unlikely friends, Archie Jones and Samad Iqbal. Hapless veterans of World War II, Archie and Samad and their families become agents of England’s irrevocable transformation. A second marriage to Clara Bowden, a beautiful, albeit tooth-challenged, Jamaican half his age, quite literally gives Archie a second lease on life, and produces Irie, a knowing child whose personality doesn’t quite match her name (Jamaican for “no problem”). Samad’s late-in-life arranged marriage (he had to wait for his bride to be born), produces twin sons whose separate paths confound Iqbal’s every effort to direct them, and a renewed, if selective, submission to his Islamic faith. Set against London’ s racial and cultural tapestry, venturing across the former empire and into the past as it barrels toward the future, White Teeth revels in the ecstatic hodgepodge of modern life, flirting with disaster, confounding expectations, and embracing the comedy of daily existence.

White Teeth

White Teeth

From the MAN BOOKER PRIZE- and WOMEN'S PRIZE-SHORTLISTED author of Swing Time, On Beauty and Grand Union 'BELIEVE THE HYPE' The Times 'The almost preposterous talent was clear from the first pages' Julian Barnes, Guardian 'Street-smart and learned, sassy and philosophical all at the same time' New York Times 'Outstanding' Sunday Telegraph The international bestseller and modern classic of multicultural Britain - an unforgettable portrait of London One of the most talked about debut novels of all time, White Teeth is a funny, generous, big-hearted novel, adored by critics and readers alike. Dealing - among many other things - with friendship, love, war, three cultures and three families over three generations, one brown mouse, and the tricky way the past has of coming back and biting you on the ankle, it is a life-affirming, riotous must-read of a book.

Zadie Smith's White Teeth

Zadie Smith's White Teeth

Offers an accessible and informative introduction to the popular novel.

Multiculturalism and Magic Realism in Zadie Smith’s novel White Teeth: Between Fiction and Reality

Multiculturalism and Magic Realism in Zadie Smith’s novel White Teeth: Between Fiction and Reality

Since the 1970s, there has been increasing concern with the impact of (post)colonialism on British identities and culture. White Teeth by Zadie Smith is the story of three families from three different cultural backgrounds, set mostly in multicultural London. The first part of this book provides an overview of the former British Empire, the Commonwealth and the history of Bangladesh, Jamaica and the Jews in England as relevant to White Teeth. Following this, the role of the (former) centre of London will be presented. Subsequently, definitions and postcolonial theories (Bhabha, Said etc.) shall be discussed.The focus of this book is on life in multicultural London. The main aspects analysed in these chapters deal with identity, the location where the novel is set and racism. A further aim of the book is a comparison between the fictional world of White Teeth and reality. One chapter is devoted to the question of magic realism and the novel's position between two worlds.In a summary, the writer hopes to convince the readers of the fascination felt when reading the novel and when plunging into the buzzing streets of contemporary multicultural London.

White Teeth

White Teeth

First published in Acoli as Lak Tar, this novel from the late Ugandan author of Song of Lawino, Song of Ocol and other major works, is the story of society on the threshold of change. A young Acoli man wishes to marry but cannot raise the bridewealth. He travels to Kampala to find work, and the author humorously relates his efforts.

NW

NW

From the MAN BOOKER PRIZE- and WOMEN'S PRIZE-SHORTLISTED author of Swing Time, White Teeth and On Beauty - a masterful and intimate novel of modern London life 'A triumph. Every sentence sings' Guardian 'Intensely funny, richly varied, always unexpected. A joyous, optimistic, angry masterpiece' Daily Telegraph 'Smith's most satisfying novel. Funny, sexy, weird, full of acute social comedy. She's up there with the best around' Evening Standard Zadie Smith's brilliant tragicomic NW follows four Londoners - Leah, Natalie, Felix and Nathan - after they've left their childhood council estate, grown up and moved on to different lives. From private houses to public parks, at work and at play, their city is brutal, beautiful and complicated. Yet after a chance encounter they each find that the choices they've made, the people they once were and are now, can suddenly, rapidly unravel. Funny, poignant and vividly contemporary, NW is as brimming with vitality as the city itself.

The 21st Century Comedy of 'White Teeth'

The 21st Century Comedy of 'White Teeth'

Seminar paper from the year 2012 in the subject English - Literature, Works, grade: 1,7, University of Bremen (English-Speaking Cultures), course: The Transnational Novel, language: English, abstract: The 21st Century Comedy of White Teeth Contents 1. Polyglot Plot 1.1. Flexible omniscient narrator 1.2. Forwarded Reversals 2. Transnational Locations 2.1. Colours of Culture 2.2. Irish Storytelling 2.3. Transcultural Veto 3. Comedy 3.1. Generic Gear 3.2. Comedic Crossings 3.2.1. Mad Mary 3.2.2. Arabian Mickey 3.2.3. Samad & Women 3.3. Male Mockery 3.3.1. Anti-hero Archie 3.3.2. Protagonist Samad 3.3.3. Old School 4. Conclusion 5. Bibliography "It is useless to base any system on a human being." (Henri Bergson. Laughter. 1900) White Teeth is both an ample and intense read as well as a bestselling success after its first publication in 2000. It has found its creative way via television adaptation and a four-hour long theatre play into the school curriculum. In my term paper I will show that White Teeth is a comedy for the 21st century generated through a polyglot plot and transnational locations. Mostly based on the first half of the novel, it is where I could draw up my hypotheses. Archibald Jones' and Samad Iqbal's male friendship is affiliated with society and culture, and therefore useful on reflexion. Their synchronized mid-life crises move towards conflicts exposed in the amusing narrative. Critically user-oriented but limited due to paper-size, I will try to converge to the multilateral scope of new fiction. While researching secondary literature published in the 2000s about postcolonial and transnational corpora many authors claimed superordinate terminology adhered to Zadie Smith's debut novel White Teeth. Nonetheless, serious analytical debates were missing an essential genre making literature enjoyable more than ever. In this term paper, my aim is to prove that Zadie Smith escaped the compelling hassle of both a debut and millennium novel by jocular upda"

Feel Free

Essays

Feel Free

AS HEARD ON BBC RADIO 4 BOOK OF THE WEEK The one and only Zadie Smith, prize-winning, bestselling author of Swing Time and White Teeth, is back with a second unmissable collection of essays No subject is too fringe or too mainstream for the unstoppable Zadie Smith. From social media to the environment, from Jay-Z to Karl Ove Knausgaard, she has boundless curiosity and the boundless wit to match. In Feel Free, pop culture, high culture, social change and political debate all get the Zadie Smith treatment, dissected with razor-sharp intellect, set brilliantly against the context of the utterly contemporary, and considered with a deep humanity and compassion. This electrifying new collection showcases its author as a true literary powerhouse, demonstrating once again her credentials as an essential voice of her generation.

Zadie Smith

Critical Essays

Zadie Smith

Zadie Smith: Critical Essays is a timely collection of critical articles examining how Zadie Smith’s novels and short stories interrogate race, postcolonialism, and identity. Essays explore the various ways Smith approaches issues of race, either by deconstructing notions of race or interrogating the complexity of biracial identity; and how Smith takes on contemporary debates concerning notions of Britishness, Englishness, and Black Britishness. Some essays also consider the shifting identities adopted by those who identify with both British and West Indian, South Asian, or East Asian ancestry. Other essays explore Smith’s contemporary postcolonial approach to Britain’s colonial legacy, and the difference between how immigrants and first-generation British-born children deal with cultural alienation and displacement. This thought-provoking collection is a much-needed critical tool for students and researchers in both contemporary British literature and Diasporic literature and culture.

Swing Time

LONGLISTED for the Man Booker Prize 2017

Swing Time

LONGLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2017 'Smith's finest. Extraordinary, truly marvellous' Observer 'Superb' Financial Times 'Breathtaking' TLS 'Pitch-perfect' Daily Telegraph 'A tale of two girls who meet in a West London dance class... A page-turner that's also beautifully written ' Glamour 'There is still no better chronicler of the modern British family than Zadie Smith' Telegraph SHORTLISTED FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARDS 2017 A dazzlingly exuberant new novel moving from north west London to West Africa, from the multi-award-winning author of White Teeth and On Beauty Two brown girls dream of being dancers - but only one, Tracey, has talent. The other has ideas: about rhythm and time, black bodies and black music, what it means to belong, what it means to be free. It's a close but complicated childhood friendship that ends abruptly in their early twenties, never to be revisited, but never quite forgotten either. Bursting with energy, rhythm and movement, Swing Time is Zadie Smith's most ambitious novel yet. It is a story about music and identity, race and class, those who follow the dance and those who lead it . . .