Frederick Douglass

Author: Jon Sterngass
Publisher: Infobase Publishing
ISBN: 1604133066
Size: 63.38 MB
Format: PDF, Kindle
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Presents the life of the former slave who, after escaping to freedom, published three autobiographies and became a newspaper editor, well-known orator, and respected leader in the anti-slavery movement.

Frederick Douglass

Author: Frances E. Ruffin
Publisher: Sterling Publishing Company, Inc.
ISBN: 1402741189
Size: 22.87 MB
Format: PDF, ePub, Docs
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The life of the famous abolitionist.

Autobiographies

Author: Frederick Douglass
Publisher: Library of America
ISBN: 9780940450790
Size: 26.81 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
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A new one-volume edition of an American classic offers the complete memoirs of the eloquent escaped slave, who in the nineteenth century shaped the abolitionist movement and became the most influential African-American of his era.

Selected Addresses Of Frederick Douglass

Author: Frederick Douglass
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
ISBN: 1625586361
Size: 54.79 MB
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Today Frederick Douglass is best known for his autobiographies; but while he was alive, he was known as a fiery orator who was always in demand. Collected here are ten of Frederick Douglass' addresses. And while it is impossible to hear Frederick Douglass speak today, these addresses still manage to instill a sense of just how powerful and intelligent Douglass was. Included here are: The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro, What the Black Man Wants, Appeal to Congress for Impartial Suffrage, The Color Line, The Future of the Colored Race, A Plea for Free Speech, The Church and Prejudice, Fighting Rebels with Only One Hand, The Negro Exodus from the Gulf States, and The Unconstitutionality of Slavery.

Frederick Douglass

Author: David B. Chesebrough
Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group
ISBN: 9780313302879
Size: 37.37 MB
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Tracing the development of Frederick Douglass's rhetorical skills, this book discusses the effect of his oratory upon his era, and analyzes the specific oratorical techniques he employed.

Who Was Frederick Douglass

Author: April Jones Prince
Publisher: Penguin
ISBN: 0698187245
Size: 46.77 MB
Format: PDF, ePub
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Born into slavery in Maryland in 1818, Frederick Douglass was determined to gain freedom--and once he realized that knowledge was power, he secretly learned to read and write to give himself an advantage. After escaping to the North in 1838, as a free man he gave powerful speeches about his experience as a slave. He was so impressive that he became a friend of President Abraham Lincoln, as well as one of the most famous abolitionists of the nineteenth century. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Frederick Douglass In Brooklyn

Author: Frederick Douglass
Publisher: Akashic Books
ISBN: 1617755028
Size: 52.23 MB
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"Insight into the remarkable life of a remarkable man. [Frederick] Douglass in Brooklyn shows how the great author and agitator associated with radicals--and he associated with the president of the United States. A fine book.” --Errol Louis, host of NY1's Road to City Hall "This collection of Douglass’s speeches in Brooklyn displays the power of the former slave’s oratory before, during, and after the Civil War. Editor Hamm, a professor of media studies, places a selection of carefully reconstructed speeches in this slim volume, and gives useful context on how they were locally received. A concise introduction provides detail about 19th-century Brooklyn and its conflicted legacy of racial prejudice and abolitionism. When Douglass’s own words are reproduced, his talent as a writer and the sheer monstrousness of slavery are both driven home." --Publishers Weekly "A collection of rousing 19th-century speeches on freedom and humanity. The eloquent orator Frederick Douglass (c. 1818-1895) delivered eight impressive speeches in Brooklyn, New York, ‘far from a bastion of abolitionist support,’ which, even as late as 1886, had only a small black population...Editor Hamm provides helpful introductions and notes and gives illuminating context and perspective by including their coverage in the ‘virulently proslavery’ Brooklyn Eagle...Covering one speech, the Eagle defended its claim of black inferiority by asserting, ‘the abject submission of a race who are content to be enslaved when there is an opportunity to be free, gives the best evidence that they are fulfilling the destiny which Providence marked out for them.’ Proof that Douglass' speeches, responding to the historical exigencies of his time, amply bear rereading today." --Kirkus Reviews “Although he never lived in Brooklyn, the great abolitionist Frederick Douglass had many friends and allies who did. Hamm has collected Douglass’s searing antislavery speeches (and denunciations of him by the pro-slavery newspaper the Brooklyn Eagle) delivered at Brooklyn locales during the mid-19th century.” --Publishers Weekly, A notable African-American Title "This timely volume [presents] Douglass’ towering voice in a way that sounds anything but dated." --Philadelphia Tribune "Though he never lived there, Frederick Douglass and the city of Brooklyn engaged in a profound repartee in the decades leading up to the Civil War, the disagreements between the two parties revealing the backward views of a borough that was much less progressive than it liked to think...Hamm...[illuminates] the complexities of a city and a figure at the vanguard of change." --Village Voice This volume compiles original source material that illustrates the complex relationship between Frederick Douglass and the city of Brooklyn. Most prominent are the speeches the abolitionist gave at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, Plymouth Church, and other leading Brooklyn institutions. Whether discussing the politics of the Civil War or recounting his relationships with Abraham Lincoln and John Brown, Douglass’s towering voice sounds anything but dated. An introductory essay examines the intricate ties between Douglass and Brooklyn abolitionists, while brief chapter introductions and annotations fill in the historical context. Frederick Douglass (1818–1895) was an abolitionist leader, spokesman for racial equality, and defender of women’s rights. He was born into slavery in Maryland and learned to read and write around age twelve, and it was through this that his ideological opposition to slavery began to take shape. He successfully escaped bondage in 1838. In 1845, he published his first autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, which became a best seller in the US and was translated into several languages. He went on to advise President Abraham Lincoln on the treatment of black soldiers during the Civil War and continued to work for equality until his death.