Who Was Rosa Parks?

Who Was Rosa Parks?

In 1955, Rosa Parks refused to give her bus seat to a white passenger in Montgomery, Alabama. This seemingly small act triggered civil rights protests across America and earned Rosa Parks the title "Mother of the Civil Rights Movement." This biography has black-and-white illustrations throughout.

Rosa Parks

Rosa Parks

How much do you know about Rosa Parks? Find out the facts you need to know about this activitist in the civil rights movement. You'll learn about the early life, challenges, and major accomplishments of this important American.

Rosa Parks

Tired of Giving In

Rosa Parks

A full-color biography series features inspirational and contemporary African-Americans of interest to young people and who are important role models for all youngsters.

Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott

Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott

Recounts the life of Rosa Parks and her actions which led to equality for African American on public transportation.

Rosa Parks

The Woman Who Ignited a Movement

Rosa Parks

Rosa Parks Rosa Parks was a quiet, dignified African-American woman who, in a world of injustice, decided to politely defy a racist policy. In doing so, she ignited a fire in the soul of a community whose "cup of endurance" would permit not even one more comparatively small injustice. Her case resulted in the Montgomery Bus Boycott wherein some 40,000 African-Americans crippled the Montgomery transportation industry with their non-violent protest of the racist policy that mandated Parks to give up her seat for white riders. But, as an unknown black minister was who elected to lead the boycott protest, one Martin Luther King, Jr., noted, it wasn't just the bus policy the African-American community was protesting, it was over 100 years of horrific injustice heaped upon a community whose founders had been forcibly brought to the United States. Inside you will read about... ✓ A Dark Legacy ✓ The Winds of Change ✓ The Stage Is Set ✓ The Civil Rights Movement ✓ Life after the Boycott And much more!It was time for a change, and the act of defiance by Parks, though not the first sacrifice, created the spark that would ignite the U.S. Civil Rights Movement. This book tells the story of the context in which Parks' refusal to yield her seat was set as well as the story of her life and legacy in a compelling, yet succinct, manner that is both packed with information and entertaining to read.

Rosa Parks and Emily Davison

Rosa Parks and Emily Davison

This book enables you to discover how these two courageous women helped change the lives of many people through their brave actions. How did their lives compare in very different times? Follow their stories to discover the differences and similarities between their amazing lives! Addressing the needs of the new history National Curriculum, this book will engage readers and encourage them to ask questions about history and how times change.

Who Was Sojourner Truth?

Who Was Sojourner Truth?

Almost 100 years before Rosa Parks refused to give up her bus seat, Sojourner Truth was mistreated by a streetcar conductor. She took him to court--and won! Before she was Sojourner Truth, she was known simply as Belle. Born a slave in New York sometime around 1797, she was later sold and separated from her family. Even after she escaped from slavery, she knew her work was not yet done. She changed her name and traveled, inspiring everyone she met and sharing her story until her death in 1883 at age eighty-six. In this easy-to-read biography, Yona Zeldis McDonough continues to share that remarkable story.

At the Dark End of the Street

Black Women, Rape, and Resistance--A New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power

At the Dark End of the Street

Groundbreaking, controversial, and courageous, here is the story of Rosa Parks and Recy Taylor—a story that reinterprets the history of America's civil rights movement in terms of the sexual violence committed against black women by white men. Rosa Parks was often described as a sweet and reticent elderly woman whose tired feet caused her to defy segregation on Montgomery’s city buses, and whose supposedly solitary, spontaneous act sparked the 1955 bus boycott that gave birth to the civil rights movement. The truth of who Rosa Parks was and what really lay beneath the 1955 boycott is far different from anything previously written. In this groundbreaking and important book, Danielle McGuire writes about the rape in 1944 of a twenty-four-year-old mother and sharecropper, Recy Taylor, who strolled toward home after an evening of singing and praying at the Rock Hill Holiness Church in Abbeville, Alabama. Seven white men, armed with knives and shotguns, ordered the young woman into their green Chevrolet, raped her, and left her for dead. The president of the local NAACP branch office sent his best investigator and organizer--Rosa Parks--to Abbeville. In taking on this case, Parks launched a movement that exposed a ritualized history of sexual assault against black women and added fire to the growing call for change.

They Walked to Freedom 1955-1956

The Story of the Montgomery Bus Boycott

They Walked to Freedom 1955-1956

In the early 1950s, Rosa Parks--who was born in Tuskegee, Alabama, and worked as a seamstress most of her life--became active in the American Civil Rights Movement and worked as a secretary for the Montgomery branch of the NAACP. She also attended the Highlander Folk School, an education center for workers' rights and racial equality. On December 1, 1955, in Montgomery, Parks refused to obey a public bus driver's orders to give up her seat in the "colored" section of the bus to a white man. She was arrested, tried, and convicted for disorderly conduct. Partially in response to her arrest, Martin Luther King, Jr., then a relatively unknown Baptist minister, led the yearlong Montgomery bus boycott, which forced the public transportation authority to end the practice of racial segregation on public buses. This event helped spark many other protests against segregation. Meanwhile, in 1956, Parks's case ultimately resulted in the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling that segregated bus service was unconstitutional. This year marks the 50th anniversary of Rosa Parks' brave act of civil disobedience. The Montgomery Advertiser presents a tribute to Ms. Parks and the impact her stand against inequality had on civil rights, illustrated with rich stories and stunning photos from the archives of the Advertiser. The newspaper began publication in 1829 and was called the Planter's Gazette. It became the Montgomery Advertiser in 1833. By the turn of the century, the Advertiser was a major voice in Alabama. In 1903, R.F. Hudson, a young Alabama newspaperman, joined the staff of the Advertiser. He helped to lead the paper toward financial success, and by 1924 he owned 10% of the stock. In 1935, he bought itoutright and five years later he bought The Alabama Journal, a competitor. In 1963, the newspapers were purchased by Carmage Walls as the largest property in his growing list of Southern newspapers. Following the sale of papers to Multimedia, in 1968, this diversified communications company continued to upgrade the quality of the newspaper by adding skilled personnel and modern publishing equipment. In December 1995 Gannett Corporation merged with Multimedia. Together, the Advertiser and Journal have garnered more Pulitzer Prizes than have all other newspapers in Alabama combined.

Overtested

How High-Stakes Accountability Fails English Language Learners

Overtested

This timely book explores what is often overlooked in policy debates about the education of English language learners: how the day-to-day dynamics of the classroom are affected by high-stakes testing and the pressures students and teachers experience and internalize as a result. The author presents and analyzes classroom observations, student work, and test scores, as well as interviews with students and teachers. A disturbing picture of today’s overtested public school classroom emerges from the events and practices described in this book. While hard to believe, all the depictions presented took place in a real elementary school classroom and reflect the current culture of extreme accountability. Overtestednot only describes the flaws in our current accountability system, but it also provides real-world solutions that can have an immediate and positive effect at the classroom, state, and national level. Chapters address key debates such as how to measure proficiency, the validity of various language assessment tools, the overuse of assessment, and the risks and benefits of teaching language arts to English language learners via mandated, structured curricula. Jessica Zacher Pandyais an Associate Professor in the Departments of Teacher Education and Liberal Studies at California State University, Long Beach. “This book tells an important tale that cannot be conveyed by numbers and tables.... It is important information for teachers; for those who depend on, employ, and train teachers; and for those who create the policies under which teachers are required to operate.” —From the Foreword byRobert Rueda, University of Southern California, author ofThe 3 Dimensions of Improving Student Performance: Finding the Right Solutions to the Right Problems “How many more dire tales of ‘schooling for assessment’ must be told before we realize that teaching and testing are not the same and that scores on standardized, multiple choice achievement tests are a sorry substitute for an engaging learning environment? In this book, Jessica Zacher Pandya reaches across ideological and institutional borders to offer reasonable, pragmatic solutions for change.” —Linda Valli, Jeffrey & David Mullan Professor of Teacher Education & Professional Development, College of Education, University of Maryland “Zacher Pandya’s invaluable book exposes the injustices and absurdities of our high-stakes accountability era. Just as importantly, it limns a more academically robust and culturally relevant instructional vision for English language learners.” —Gerald Campano, University of Pennsylvania