Wild Color

The Complete Guide to Making and Using Natural Dyes

Wild Color

Counsels beginner through experienced dyers on how to dye all types of fibers using traditional plants in new ways, providing step-by-step, swatch-complemented instructions for 250 options using more than 65 plant species. Original.

The Weaver's Studio - Woven Shibori

Revised and Updated

The Weaver's Studio - Woven Shibori

Rediscover Woven Shibori In this update of the classic Woven Shibori, master weaver Catharine Ellis teaches weavers of all skill levels how to create beautiful dyed woven cloth, using environmentally friendly natural dyes. Shibori is a traditional Japanese technique, in which a piece of cloth is shaped by folding, stitching, tying, or wrapping then dyed to create stunning color patterns. Ellis developed a method of weaving resist warp and weft threads directly into the cloth and shared her findings in her breakthrough book. Featuring all-new information on working with natural dyes and dozens of new photographs, this revised edition is an invaluable resource for weavers. It features: • Techniques for incorporating shibori into two-shaft weaves, monk's belt, overshot, twills, laces, and other patterns • Guidance and inspiration for creating your own woven shibori designs • Instructions for preparing the fabric for dyeing and finishing the dyed cloth • Recipes for creating natural dyes from plants and insects to dye both plant and animal fibers • Special effects for enhancing woven shibori, including layering colors, cross dyeing, felting, creating permanent pleats, and burning out Woven Shibori opens up a world of creative surface design possibilities for weavers and textile artists.

Common Threads

Weaving Community through Collaborative Eco-Art

Common Threads

A guide to creating community-based art installations using green waste, invasive species and natural materials Disposing of unwanted natural materials can be expensive and time-consuming, or it can present a tremendous opportunity for creating collaborative eco-art. Invasive-species control, green-waste management, urban gardening, and traditional crafts can all be brought together to strengthen community relationships and foster responsible land stewardship. Simple, easily taught, creative techniques applied with shared purpose become the modern-day equivalent of a barn raising or a quilting bee. Common Threads is a unique guide to engaging community members in communal handwork for the greater good. Sharon Kallis provides a wealth of ideas for: Working with unwanted natural materials, with an emphasis on green waste and invasive species Visualizing projects that celebrate the human element while crafting works of art or environmental remediation Creating opportunities for individuals to connect with nature in a unique, meditative, yet community-oriented way Combining detailed, step-by-step instructions with tips for successful process and an overview of completed projects, Common Threads is a different kind of weaving book. This inspirational guide is designed to help artists and activists foster community, build empowerment, and develop a do-it-together attitude while planning and implementing works of collaborative eco-art. Sharon Kallis is a Vancouver artist who specializes in working with unwanted natural materials. Involving community in connecting traditional hand techniques with invasive species and garden waste, she creates site-specific installations that become ecological interventions. Her recent projects include The Urban Weaver Project, Aberthau: flax=food+fibre, and working closely with fiber artists, park ecologists, First Nations basket weavers, and others.

When Technology Fails

A Manual for Self-Reliance, Sustainability, and Surviving the Long Emergency, 2nd Edition

When Technology Fails

There’s never been a better time to “be prepared.” Matthew Stein’s comprehensive primer on sustainable living skills—from food and water to shelter and energy to first-aid and crisis-management skills—prepares you to embark on the path toward sustainability. But unlike any other book, Stein not only shows you how to live “green” in seemingly stable times, but to live in the face of potential disasters, lasting days or years, coming in the form of social upheaval, economic meltdown, or environmental catastrophe. When Technology Fails covers the gamut. You’ll learn how to start a fire and keep warm if you’ve been left temporarily homeless, as well as the basics of installing a renewable energy system for your home or business. You’ll learn how to find and sterilize water in the face of utility failure, as well as practical information for dealing with water-quality issues even when the public tap water is still flowing. You’ll learn alternative techniques for healing equally suited to an era of profit-driven malpractice as to situations of social calamity. Each chapter (a survey of the risks to the status quo; supplies and preparation for short- and long-term emergencies; emergency measures for survival; water; food; shelter; clothing; first aid, low-tech medicine, and healing; energy, heat, and power; metalworking; utensils and storage; low-tech chemistry; and engineering, machines, and materials) offers the same approach, describing skills for self-reliance in good times and bad. Fully revised and expanded—the first edition was written pre-9/11 and pre-Katrina, when few Americans took the risk of social disruption seriously—When Technology Fails ends on a positive, proactive note with a new chapter on "Making the Shift to Sustainability," which offers practical suggestions for changing our world on personal, community and global levels.