Will Save the Galaxy for Food

Will Save the Galaxy for Food

Space travel just isn't what it used to be. With the invention of Quantum Teleportation, space heroes aren't needed anymore. When one particularly unlucky ex-adventurer masquerades as famous pilot and hate figure Jacques McKeown, he's sucked into an ever-deepening corporate and political intrigue.

Jam

Jam

We were prepared for an earthquake. We had a flood plan in place. We could even have dealt with zombies. Probably. But no one expected the end to be quite so... sticky... or strawberry scented. Yahtzee Croshaw (Mogworld, Zero Punctuation Reviews) returns to print with a follow-up to his smash-hit debut: Jam, a dark comedy about the one apocalypse no one predicted. * The hilarious new novel by the author of Mogworld! * Croshaw's Zero Punctuation Reviews is the most viewed video game review on the web! * For lovers of bizarre horror and unforgettable characters! "[Croshaw is] able to pull off slapstick comedy in print, and that's no easy feat." –ComicsAlliance

Will Destroy the Galaxy for Cash

Will Destroy the Galaxy for Cash

Will Destroy the Galaxy for Cash is the follow up tale to Will Save the Galaxy for Food from the mind of writer Yahtzee Croshaw (Mogworld, Jam, Differently Morphous). With the age of heroic star pilots and galactic villains completely killed by quantum teleportation, the ex-star pilot currently named Dashford Pierce is struggling to find his identity in a changing universe. Then, a face from his past returns and makes him an offer he can't refuse: take part in just one small, slightly illegal, heist, and not only will he have the means to start the new life he craves, but also save his childhood hero from certain death. What could go wrong? If you need to ask--you don't know Dashford Pierce. Before long, Pierce is surrounded by peril, and forced to partner with the very same supervillains he'd spent his heroic career thwarting. But when he's confronted by the uncomfortable truth that star pilots might not have been the force for good, they had intended to be, he begins to wonder if the villains hadn't had the right idea all along...

Differently Morphous

Differently Morphous

After centuries of successfully keeping magic out of the public eye, the Ministry of Occultism faces new challenges in the age of social media, government scrutiny, public relations, and political correctness. The fact that otherworldly gelatinous creatures are infesting the English countryside while a magical serial killer is on the loose isn't making their job any easier. On the job are the Ministry's top agents: a junior operative with a photographic memory (and not much else), a couple of overgrown schoolboys with godlike powers, and a demonstrably insane magician.

Mogworld

Mogworld

In a world full to bursting with would-be heroes, Jim couldn't be less interested in saving the day. His fireballs fizzle. He's awfully grumpy. Plus, he's been dead for about sixty years. When a renegade necromancer wrenches him from eternal slumber and into a world gone terribly, bizarrely wrong, all Jim wants is to find a way to die properly, once and for all. On his side, he's got a few shambling corpses, an inept thief, and a powerful death wish. But he's up against tough odds: angry mobs of adventurers, a body falling apart at the seams - and a team of programmers racing a deadline to hammer out the last few bugs in their AI.

The Theory of Everything and the Man Who Could Save the Earth

All But the World Is Loving 2

The Theory of Everything and the Man Who Could Save the Earth

A man’s love for nature could turn out to be the greatest love for humanity, and such a fondness could ultimately pave the way on his quest to enlighten and encourage everyone about the essence of that love—to passionately save the earth and its biodiversity from destruction. By saving the earth from the ravages of anthropogenic climate change—deforestation, peak oil, and rising seas—a love for nature can reverse the trends and therefore prolong life for not only the planet but for human beings as well. The Theory of Everything and the Man Who Could Save the Earth is dedicated to nature conservationists and environmental advocates from around the world, and it explores a philosophical solution to the catastrophe of global climate change. Formulating a so-called “theory of everything” that can apply not just to physics, astronomy, and the sciences—but to philosophy, knowledge, and history as well—it provides a framework to challenge long-held truths and overcome extremism, skepticism, and superstitious beliefs. A unified, consistent model of the universe, its origin, and its operation may provide a panacea in a world troubled by climate change and fundamentalism. Bringing together science with religion and the history of ideas can crystallize a worldview rooted in a love for both knowledge and nature—an essential part of the vision for preventing environmental collapse and saving human existence.

The Galaxy

A Magazine of Entertaining Reading

The Galaxy


The Galaxy

The Galaxy


The Smart Girl's Guide to God, Guys, and the Galaxy

Save the Drama! and 100 Other Practical Tips for Teens

The Smart Girl's Guide to God, Guys, and the Galaxy

The Smart Girl’s Guide to God, Guys, and the Galaxy melds spiritual and practical advice with humor—a winning combination for teens trying to navigate the ups and downs of life with grace and confidence. Girls will be encouraged and challenged with sound, biblically-based advice equipping them to stand up for their faith and live the Christian walk every day—plus, they’ll encounter some fun, common-sense tips along the way. Each of the 101 accessible chapters wraps up with relevant scripture selections and thought-provoking questions, making The Smart Girl’s Guide a perfect book to work through with friends or small groups.

The Greatest Show in the Galaxy

The Discerning Fan's Guide to Doctor Who

The Greatest Show in the Galaxy

The long-running BBC science fiction program Doctor Who has garnered an intense and extremely loyal fan base since its 1963 debut. This work examines the influences of psychology, literature, pop culture, and the social sciences on Doctor Who storylines and characters. Topics explored include how such issues as class, gender, and sexual attraction factor into the relationships between the Doctor and his companions; whether the Doctor suffers from multiple personality disorder or other psychological afflictions; and the role of the Doctor's native culture in shaping his sense of identity.