Wolfsong

Wolfsong

Ox was twelve when his daddy taught him a very valuable lesson. He said that Ox wasn't worth anything and people would never understand him. Then he left. Ox was sixteen when he met the boy on the road, the boy who talked and talked and talked. Ox found out later the boy hadn't spoken in almost two years before that day, and that the boy belonged to a family who had moved into the house at the end of the lane. Ox was seventeen when he found out the boy's secret, and it painted the world around him in colors of red and orange and violet, of Alpha and Beta and Omega. Ox was twenty-three when murder came to town and tore a hole in his head and heart. The boy chased after the monster with revenge in his bloodred eyes, leaving Ox behind to pick up the pieces. It's been three years since that fateful day--and the boy is back. Except now he's a man, and Ox can no longer ignore the song that howls between them.

Wolfsong

Wolfsong

In the Cascade Range of northwest Washington, Tom Joseph, a young Indian who had gone south to attend college, returns for his uncle's funeral and finds himself caught up in the old man’s fight to save the wilderness from destruction. In his first novel, Louis Owens exposes the raw edge of the current American land-rights controversy and poses questions about authenticity and the common bonds that American Indians, of very different or mixed backgrounds, are in the process of discovering today.

Wolfsong

A Natural and Fabulous History of Wolves

Wolfsong

"For many, wolf is a great teacher - the very spirit of strength and endurance. For others he inspires deep-seated anxieties, fears that have resulted in a campaign of extermination so long-lived that, until recently, the wolf has teetered on the edge of extinction. From famous "outlaw" wolves of the early twentieth centeury, such as Ghost Wolf and Snowdrift (who had bounties on their heads), to the archetypal Father Wolf of Native American religion, Wolfsong explores the complexity of our relationship to the wolf and pays tribute to this elegant and wise animal."--Jacket.

Wolfsong

Wolfsong

It was Nico who first told me I was a werewolf. But then it was Nico who first told me almost everything...

Wolfsong

Tales from the Crescent

Wolfsong

Three species. One country. A vicious murder and a village of the dead. A soldier desperate for vengeance at any price. Amber is sworn to uphold justice on the Crescent. But as grief and rage drive her to the edge of insanity, she may no longer be capable of choosing between justice and personal vengeance - and may the gods help any being that stands in her way. If you plan to join this ride, bring your sword. Sanity is optional.

The Heretic's Tarot

The Secret Pattern of the Tarot Revealed.

The Heretic's Tarot

It is said that the secret of the Tarot is hidden in the figure of the classic Hanged Man card. The "correct arrangement" of the cards, that reveals their true meaning, is connected to the "Hanged Man" figure. This book is about a system that underlies the structure of the Tarot cards; a system that hid a heresy and a means of passing the teachings of that heresy on to others by using the cards as an instructional device. The system, or pattern, hidden in the Tarot has been spoken of, in rumor, since the cards first made their appearance in Europe, so long ago. This book reveals and fully explains this connection and the resulting secret pattern to the cards.

The Wiccan Tao

A Reinterpretation of the Tao Te Ching

The Wiccan Tao

The Tao Te Ching is the most translated religious book in the world, after the Bible. It is a book to be meditated upon. The words "Tao Te Ching" roughly translate into English as "the book of the way and its power" and it contains observations about Nature and its laws. It comes from a tradition which is pagan in context and has been passed down from ancient times. I hope this book will be a benefit to all who read it, more especially to those in the Wiccan Craft who have lost so many of the ancient teachings through intervention by those who have held those teachings in such low regard in the past. This is a book about Nature, and observations of it can benefit anyone especially someone practicing a Nature based religion such as Wicca. The Tao Te Ching gives us instruction about Nature, how to live in harmony with Nature, how to lead or teach others to live in harmony with Nature. I have written this book in such a way that it is as true to the original as I can make it, and also to be of use to modern Wiccan readers by speaking to them in terms easily understood by anyone practicing the Craft today.

A Wolf Song

A Story of Forgiveness through Gratitude

A Wolf Song

A Wolf Song is a healing story about a multidimensional, dual-life journey of tragedy, gratitude and forgiveness. Its key characters—Hanna and Margaret; their “spirit” wolves, Nano and Nala; family members; and teacher Trudy Goodenough—meet every ten years under Trudy’s guidance and the wolves’ whims. The story begins at childbirth; the girls meet nearing their tenth birthday and discover their wolf spirits under a jump rope. Each chapter contains a verse which reveals the lessons of each chapter. Ordered to meet every ten years by the wolves, Hanna and Margaret meet at twenty in Wales and in New York City at thirty. Nano and Nala are not necessarily balanced. Their karmic rites spill over into the young women’s lives. One of the wolf spirits wreaks havoc at a public event, and a battle between light and darkness ensues. “Lisa Osina’s book brings you into an enduring balance between the physical world and the world of spirit.” Lynn Andrews, shaman and author of Medicine Woman and 27 other spiritual and self-empowerment books.

Listening to the Land

Native American Literary Responses to the Landscape

Listening to the Land

For better or worse, representations abound of Native Americans as a people with an innate and special connection to the earth. This study looks at the challenges faced by Native American writers who confront stereotypical representations as they assert their own ethical relationship with the earth. Lee Schweninger considers a range of genres (memoirs, novels, stories, essays) by Native writers from various parts of the United States. Contextualizing these works within the origins, evolution, and perpetuation of the “green” labels imposed on American Indians, Schweninger shows how writers often find themselves denying some land ethic stereotypes while seeming to embrace others. Taken together, the time periods covered inListening to the Landspan more than a hundred years, from Luther Standing Bear’s description of his late-nineteenth-century life on the prairie to Linda Hogan’s account of a 1999 Makah hunt of a gray whale. Two-thirds of the writers Schweninger considers, however, are well-known voices from the second half of the twentieth century, including N. Scott Momaday, Louise Erdrich, Vine Deloria Jr., Gerald Vizenor, and Louis Owens. Few ecocritical studies have focused on indigenous environmental attitudes, in comparison to related work done by historians and anthropologists.Listening to the Landwill narrow this gap in the scholarship; moreover, it will add individual Native American perspectives to an understanding of what, to these writers, is a genuine Native American philosophy regarding the land.