Writing Across Worlds

Literature and Migration

Writing Across Worlds

International migration has long been a dominant feature of world literature from both post-industrial and developing countries. The increasing demands of the global economic system and continued political instability in many of the world's region have highlighted this shifting map of the world's peoples. Yet, political concern for the larger scale economic and social impact of migration has effectively obscured the nature of the migratory nature of the migratory experience itself, the emotions and practicalities of departure, travel, arrival and the attempt to rebuild a home. Writing Across Worlds explores an extraordinary range of migration literaturesm from letters and diaries to journalistic articles, autobiographies and fiction, in order to analyse the reality of the migrant's experience. The sheer range of writings - Irish, Friulian, Italian, Jewish and South Asian British, Gastarbeiter literature from Germany, Pied noir, French-Algerian and French West Indian writing, Carribbean novels, Slovene emigrant texts, Japanese-Canadian writing, migration in American novels, narratives from Australia, South Africa, Samoa and others - illustrate the diversity of global migratory experience and emphasise the social context of literature. The geographic and literary range of Writing Across Worlds makes this collection an invaluable analysis of migration, giving voice to the hope, pain, nostalgia and triumph of lives lived in other places.

Writing Across Worlds

Contemporary Writers Talk

Writing Across Worlds

Since its foundation in 1984, the literary magazine Wasafiri has featured work by authors who transport the mind beyond the maps of narrowly defined borders. This selection of interviews features writers who have featured in the magazine, explaining their work and the philosophies that underpin their ideologies.

Recasting Postcolonialism

Women Writing Between Worlds

Recasting Postcolonialism

This book analyzes works of Assia Djebar and Leila Sebbar in context of postcolonial theory and French-Algerian history, literature and visual arts.

Writing-between-Worlds

TransArea Studies and the Literatures-without-a-fixed-Abode

Writing-between-Worlds

This book proposes that there is no better, no more complex way to access a community, a society, an era and its cultures than through literature. For millennia, literature from a wide variety of geocultural areas has gathered knowledge about life, about survival, and about living together, without either falling into discursive or disciplinary specializations or functioning as a regulatory mechanism for cultural knowledge. Literature is able to offer its readers knowledge through direct participation in the form of step-by-step intellectual and affective experiences. Through this ability, it can reach and affect audiences across great spatial and temporal distances. Literature – what different times and cultures have been able to understand as such in a broad sense – has always been characterized by its transareal and transcultural origins and effects. It is the product of many logics, and it teaches us to think polylogically rather than monologically. Literature is an experiment in living, and living in a state of experimentation. About the author Ottmar Ette has been Chair of Romance Literature at the University of Potsdam, Germany, since 1995. He is Honorary Member of the Modern Language Association of America (MLA) (elected in 2014), member of the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and Humanities (elected in 2013), and regular member of the Academia Europaea (since 2010).

Writing Across Distances and Disciplines

Research and Pedagogy in Distributed Learning

Writing Across Distances and Disciplines

Writing Across Distances and Disciplines addresses questions that cross borders between onsite, hybrid, and distributed learning environments, between higher education and the workplace, and between distance education and composition pedagogy. This groundbreaking volume raises critical issues, clarifies key terms, reviews history and theory, analyzes current research, reconsiders pedagogy, explores specific applications of WAC and WID in distributed environments, and considers what business and education might teach one another about writing and learning. Exploring the intersection of writing across the curriculum, composition studies, and distance learning , it provides an in-depth look at issues of importance to students, faculty, and administrators regarding the technological future of writing and learning in higher education.

Mapping World Literature

International Canonization and Transnational Literatures

Mapping World Literature

Mapping World Literature explores the study of literature and literary history in light of global changes, looking at what defines world literature in the 21st century. Surveying ideas of literature from Goethe to the present, Thomsen devises a compelling concept of literary constellations. He discusses a wide-range of critical positions, identifies the limits of comparative and post-colonial approaches and examines two specific cases: literature written by migrant writers and the literature of genocide, war and disaster. Mapping World Literature captures new ways of understanding the patterns and trends that emerge in literature, opening up and inspiring research to map patterns in the field.

India in Britain

South Asian Networks and Connections, 1858-1950

India in Britain

India in Britain traces the often hidden lines of Indian-British connection which took place on British soil during the period 1858-1950. Moving away from orthodox narratives of the Raj and the British presence in India, this book exposes a differently- contoured landscape, drawing attention to the significance of the many networks and connections that South Asians themselves established on British soil. Interdisciplinary in ethos, it stretches across ten decades, from the high point of empire to the better known period of migration following World War Two. Presenting readings of cultural history drawn from little-known archival material and interrogating contemporary readings of diaspora and migration in the light of this new material, it points to the urgent need to open up the parameters of this rich field of study. The contents of the book which cover topics ranging from literature, to the visual arts, history and politics, will be illuminating to those interested in the long history of the South Asian presence in Britain and its relevance to today's culturally diverse present. The perspectives of the different essays, written by several internationally distinguished scholars provide a depth and range of interdisciplinary approaches.

Disorientation

France, Vietnam, and the Ambivalence of Interculturality

Disorientation

This book explores literary representations of cultural hybridity spanning nearly half a century, a period marked by major shifts in Franco-Vietnamese relations. How can identity be thought and represented outside of the oppositional categories that divide cultures, histories, languages and races? Can the intercultural subject be understood as more than a site of cultural contestation, as anything other than a confrontation between incompatible binary opposites? This book offers compelling responses to these questions through a series of close readings of francophone novels written by Vietnamese authors during and just after the colonial period. While many contemporary studies of cultural hybridity tend to privilege the postmodern, deconstructive play of postcolonial identities, Disorientation seeks to uncover what is often obscured in such celebratory analyses: the rigid and potentially traumatic conditions under which colonized subjects experienced the tensions and contradictions of intercultural identity. The close readings that form the core of the book are inflected by cultural and historical considerations, and informed by a range of primary documents that includes training manuals for colonial administrators, works of imperialist propaganda, tourist guidebooks and travel writing, and textbooks from Franco-Vietnamese schools. These contextualized analyses recast the problem of interculturality in an Asian francophone context, expanding the historical and cultural fields within which questions of identity and difference are currently discussed and offering a striking perspective from which to question postcolonial theories of hybridity.

Maggie Gee: Writing the Condition-of-England Novel

Maggie Gee: Writing the Condition-of-England Novel

The first female Chair of the Royal Society of Literature and translated into thirteen languages, Maggie Gee is writing the Victorian condition-of-England novel for 21st-century Britain. In the first critical study of Gee's work, Mine Özyurt Kiliç identifies the specific social problems her novels address and explains the social consciousness similarities Gee shares with the Victorians. Analyzing how Gee adjusts the condition-of-England novel to reflect contemporary Britain enables Özyurt Kiliç to reveal the accuracy of Gee's rich portraits of Britain. She focuses on Gee's ability to cut across the boundaries of race, class and gender, mix voices from the margin with the majority and challenge and change the idea of the mainstream. As an active, self-conscious and critical participant in the literary world, Gee paints a panoramic view of society. Her critiques of class, race and the world of publishing, allow Özyurt Kiliç to cover a wide range of topics and detail how English fiction shapes and influences, and is shaped and influenced by, the contemporary literary market.

Marginality in the Contemporary British Novel

Marginality in the Contemporary British Novel

The 'Marginal' as a concept has become an integral part of the British novel as it stands at the turn of the century. Both popular and literary fiction since the mid-1970s has seen an increasing emphasis on the marginal subject. This study offers readings of a wide range of contemporary British novels that represent characters or communities at the margin of society. Nicola Allen analyses three conceptual categories representing the marginal subject in the contemporary British novel: the character of the misfit or outsider; the emergence of the grotesque; and the rediscovery of previously marginalized narratives such as myth and fantasy. This innovative and original monograph focuses on the contention that the contemporary novel of marginality conveys a belief in the socially transformative powers of narrative, and suggests that narrative has played a central role in bringing marginal politics and marginal issues to the fore in contemporary Britain.